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20100108
20100108
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't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
. karzai -- having legitimacy, and i do not think we have that. this will depend on achieving security, which i think is achievable, and with good government comes with our own money invested in jobs. without jobs, afghanistan will not be a positive scenario in the future, but i must conclude by pointing out that this is not going to affect our domestic national security, as we see with the last three plots. the underwear bomber came from nine cheerio region with -- came from nigeria. one of them came from somalia, and major hassan came from washington, d.c. thank you very much. [applause] >> peter has to leave at 11:00, so he should take the first few questions, and there is a microphone in the back of the room for anyone who would like to ask a question. >> i work 30 years of the journalists. i retired two years ago. my question is for peter. what i hear now is exactly what i was hearing before the iraq war, and the promise was saddam hussein was on popular. then we will have a democracy. now it is an islamic system. there is a hypothesis that afghan people love us. the last point i
ability for governments. this was discussed at length to present karzai, and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably in putting the trip that hillary clinton and i made an afghanistan in october 18 and 19th in conjunction with president karzai's inauguration. the afghans understood this. they are very comfortable with it. . . to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it helped -- influenced me a lot as we tried to develop our own benchmarks. but i think we have to be very careful about two things. maybe th
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
runoff, thereby taking the initial iec countdown to 50% and having president karzai accept that. which i think was a good step for afghanistan. of course, the runoff never happened when the opponent pulled out, but they were able to maintain that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. let me just briefly introduce our three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, probably no more than 10 minutes each if you can keep it to that so that we can have a frank and vibrant discussion in q&a after that. to my far left is scott ward iw who was on a leave of absence last year to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. scott was also involved in the elections in 2005 for parliament when he was with the jemb. you have their bios in front of you, so i will not go into too much detail. isabel has also worked in afghanistan back in 2005 as a political adviser. she knows quite a bit about afghanistan's elections and has been following the process is very closely. finally to my left, grant kippen,
and eventual victory by hamid karzai. they discuss the presidential elections for this may. it was held at the u.s. institute of peace in washington, d.c. >> good morning, everyone. we can proceed. thank everyone for coming. my name is john dempsey with the u.s. institute of peace, based in afghanistan. i have the privilege of actually being here in washington this week for this, our first public event on afghanistan of 2010. i'm so happy we have such a good turnout, i recognize some faces here, see a lot of people i haven't seen around before and i look forward to a frank discussion with our distinguished panelist today on a subject that clearly has been getting a lot of attention over the last year, given what we saw in the difficult election season in afghanistan last year but that also has not yet gone away. i think once we got through the difficult process of the elections last year, people were breathing a collective sigh of relief that we moved on and could actually get on with governance and moving toward with strategic objectives in the country, but yet, we have another electio
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6